'An tOcras Mór' The Great Hunger.

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Forum Home > How Each County Was Affected "The Great Hunger" > County Cork - Corcaigh / Co. Chorcaí

SWIFTY
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April 27, 2015 at 4:49 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
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Posts: 1033

This note is for Co Cork during the great hunger of 1845/50

Please help by posting any links about Cork during the years 0f 1845/50

And if you could please share the note ... {Thanks}

GREAT HUNGER IN THE COUNTY OF CORK

Very lamentable accounts are given from various parts of the county of Cork. From gantry, Skibbereen, Crookhaven, Castletown, and Tracton, the reports present the same gloomy features. The intelligence from these scenes of misery is summed up by the Cork Examiner as follows:--

"SKIBBEREEN.--In the parish of Kilmoe, fourteen died on Sunday; three of these were buried in coffins, eleven were buried without other covering than the rags they wore when alive. And one gentleman, a good and charitable man, speaking of this case, says--'The distress is so appalling, that we must throw away all feelings of delicacy;' and another says--'I would rather give 1s. to a starving man than 4s. 6d. for a coffin.' One hundred and forty have died in the Skibbereen Workhouse in one month; eight have died in one day! And Mr. M'Carthy Downing states that 'they came into the house merely and solely for the purpose of getting a coffin.' The Rev. Mr. Clancy visits a farm, and there, in one house, 'he administered the last rites of religion to six person.' On a subsequent occasion, he 'prepared for death a father and a daughter lying in the same bed.' Dr. Donovan solemnly assures a public meeting that the people are 'dropping in dozens about them.' Mr. Marmion says that work on the public road is even more destructive than fever; for the unfed wretches have not energy enough to keep their blood in circulation, and they drop down from the united effects of cold and hunger--never to rise again.

"In Tracton, deaths, it appears, are occurring too. Mr. Corkoran, P.P., in a letter to Mr. Redington says: 'Over sixteen deaths occurred in my parishes for the last ten days. I am morally certain that each and every one of them was occasioned and accelerated by want of food and fire. Buckley, of Ballyvorane, and Sullivan, of Oysterhaven, died suddenly. Buckley dropped dead on the works, after a journey of three miles before day. His wife will make affidavit, that he had not sufficient food the night before he died, and that she and the rest of her family lived thirty-six hours on wild weeds to spare a bit of the cake for him. (In this case, a Coroner's verdict was given without sight of the body.) This horrifying economy is practiced by scores of families in this district. Similar effects must be expected from similar causes. I fear we must bury the dead coffinless in future. My God! what a revolting idea! Without food when alive, without a coffin when dead.'"

The Rev. Robert Traill, chairman of the Schule Relief Committee, county Cork, states that 15,000 persons in that wide district are destitute; of this 5000 are entirely dependent on casual charity; fifty deaths have resulted from famine and "hundreds" are so reduced that not food or medicine can restore them! The deaths, he adds, now average 25 daily!!

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:33 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
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Posts: 1033

 

Ten additional deaths by starvation have occurred in the barony of gantry. The Jury at the inquests at Bantry handed in the following remonstrance, by their foreman, Mr. E. O'Sullivan:-- "That we feel it our duty to state, under the correction of the Court, that it is our opinion that, if the Government of the country shall persevere in its determination of refusing to use the means available to it for the purpose of lowering the price of food, so as to place it within the reach of the labouring poor, the result will be a sacrifice of human life from starvation to a frightful extent, and endangerment of property and of the public peace . .

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:34 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

There are many similar establishments in operation through the county; but, we prefer the annexed because the idea originated with the Society of Friends. The funds for its support are chiefly raised among this charitable class; and we are happy to state that the establishment is now in a position to supply 1500 gallons of Soup daily, at a loss, or rather cost, of from £120 to £150 per month to the supporters of the design. The present calls are for from 150 to 180 gallons daily, requiring 120 pounds of good beef, 27 pounds of rice, 27 pounds of oatmeal, 27 pounds of split peas, and 14 ounces of spices, with a quantity of vegetables. Tickets, at one penny each, are unsparingly distributed, on presenting one of which, each poor person receives one quart of soup, with half a small loaf of bread; and both are of good quality.

In the making of the Soup, the greatest possible cleanliness is observed; attention is paid to the poor, who throng the place daily, for their cheap supply of food; as well as to the visitors, who go to see the soup made, and who are requested to test its quality, and suggest any improvement. The vats, which are shown in the Sketch, are worked by a steamengine, in an adjoining house; and, to ensure cleanliness, as well as sweetness, they are used alternately. Too much credit cannot be given to this establishment, and to the exertions of the Society of Friends in general; for, not content with originating these Soup Establishments, they have also raised a sum of money for distribution in the west, so as the more effectually to relieve the poor in distant districts.

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:34 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
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Posts: 1033

THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS.[Apr 4, 1846.

On Saturday last, the Government Sales of Indian Corn and Meal commenced in Cork. Immediately on the depôts being opened, the crowds of poor persons who gathered round them were so turbulently inclined as to require the immediate interference of the police, who remained there throughout the day. Among the poor, who were of the humblest description, and needing charitable relief, the sales were but scanty. The occasion had become of necessity; for potatoes have risen to 11d. market price for 14lbs.; and, some of the leading commercial men in Cork have made a calculation, which shows that the Government can afford to sell the Indian Corn at a much cheaper rate. Our artist at Cork has sketched the crowd immediately on the opening of the store.

We feel gratified to learn that a steamer has been despatched from Cork to Dublin, laden with 600 sacks of Indian meal.

One half, by the orders, is to be despatched by the Royal, and the other by the Grand Canal, to the interior. It must be acknowledged that her Majesty's Government are executing their duty promptly and with energy.

The Cork Examiner of Tuesday, contains the following account of the sale:--

"The bakers in Dublin are selling India meal bread in large quantities to the better classes, as well as to the poor, and all consider it more palatable than the ordinary whole-meal, or brown bread.

"The price fixed on it was one penny per pound. The result of the day's sale is sufficient to dissipate all further doubt, and to demand the most serious attention of the citizens of Cork.

"We understand that 4480lbs. of the corn meal were sold on Saturday, at one penny per pound.

"The committee waited this morning on Mr. Hewitson, to grant them a further supply, they, of course, offering to pay the full price for it; but Mr. Hewitson was compelled to refuse the request, he having no orders from the Government to that effect.

"The people, supposing that the supply would be continued, assembled in hundreds round the depôts; but were informed of the fact of there being no more for sale. Considerable excitement was occasioned by the announcement, and the Mayor, fearing that a disburance might arise in consequence, published a public notice, stating that when the order, which was daily expected, should arrive, further supplies would be distributed."

 

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:34 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

With regards several family members in the same home or internet cafe all wanting to sign this petition at the same time Yes this can be done .

Any amount of people in a household/Cafe can sign it .

There is no problems with all you're family & friends using the same internet account .

Each signature requires its own email address

We do need signatures, not just shares

 

http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:35 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

History states that the Famine occurred because of a failure in the potato crop in Ireland. The Irish were under British occupation at the time. Rich landlords controlled the country, though they were a small portion of the population. Most of the population served as tenants to these landlords, and suffered from high rents and taxes. Poverty ran deep in the tenant class, which used the potato as the main staple of its diet. When the crop failed, panic set in. The Irish sold what they had, including boats and fishing equipment to feed their suffering families. One in three people died in the area surrounding Skibbereen. Most concur that there was plenty of food in Ireland – plenty enough to feed the starving citizens. But the food was exported for profit that was made by the British government and the Anglo Irish ruling class. http://thinplacestour.com/2010/06/16/skibbereen/

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:35 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Emigration from Queenstown, County Cork, Ireland

From 1848 to 1950 over six million adults and children experienced emigration from Queenstown, County Cork, Ireland. Over 2.5 million Irish departed from Cobh, making it the single most important port of emigration.

 

This exodus from Ireland was largely a result of poverty, crop failures, the land system, and a lack of opportunity. Irish emigration from Queenstown, County Cork, Ireland reached unprecedented proportions during the famine, as people fled from hunger and disease.

 

The port of Queenstown was named for Queen Victoria. It was in 1849 that the Queen first visited the small seaport known as Cobh (Irish for Cove) on the Southern Coast of Ireland. After the Irish independence of 1922, the town was renamed Cobh and became Ireland's most strategic point of emigration, witnessing Ireland's sorrowful release of its treasured sons and daughters to brighter and better things in the New World. http://www.findingmyirish.com/emigration-queenstown.htm

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:36 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
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Posts: 1033

The Great Irish Famine of 1845-1850, the 150th anniversary commemorations of which commenced in 1995, is one example of an historical famine that may be worth studying from the perspective of the ecologist or the conservationist. Following the arrival of the potato blight in Ireland in 1845 and the consequent failure of the national potato crop (the staple food of the poor) in that year and in 1846, an estimated one million people perished from starvation and disease. Throughout the period of the famine in Ireland, much farm produce and livestock was stolen and consumed by those in need. Turnip stealing was reported in counties as far apart as Cork (in the south-west), Donegal (in the north-west) and Wexford (in the south-east) (Donnelly, 1975; Bardon, 1992: 283; Kinsella, 1995). According to James S. Donnelly, jr (1975: 87) the situation was so serious in parts of County Cork, that some farmers took to shooting at these half-starved thieves. With little apparent concern for turnip stealing in other areas of Ireland such as on the Duke of Devonshire's County Waterford estate in 1847 - due, no doubt, to the predominance of oat cultivation as a cash crop there (Fewer, 1995: 71) - regional variation in such survival strategies of the starving, and consequently in the famine's effect on wildlife as an alternative resource, must have occurred. Sheep stealing, particularly in mountainous areas (Crawford, 1995: 65), was another grim aspect of the famine where, in the words of Anne Kinsella (1995: 55), the sheep "carcasses were ripped open and carried away leaving the head and skin in the field". Since the stolen crops or livestock were private property, thefts like these are well documented - a distinction not usually enjoyed by wild plants and animals. http://www.oocities.org/gregory_fewer/envfam.htm

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:37 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Famine Orphans from County Cork to Australia 1848-1850 ( Inc Mallow Orphans)

The following records of young girls sent to Australia between October, 1848 and August, 1850, are taken from Irish Famine Orphans in Australia by Valda Strauss, published 1993 in Volume 11 of the Mallow Field Club Journal.Material for this article was taken from the book Barefoot and Pregnant? by Trevor McClaughlin. Additional information on individuals on this list, as well as lists for other parts of Ireland, can be found in McClaughlin's book, which was recently reprinted. Contact Trevor McClaughlin for information on how to order, or about the second volume, which is available in softcover from The Genealogical Society of Victoria.

Locations transcribed from the original records are assumed to be as follows:

for Kingsale, read Kinsale

for Roscarvie, read Rosscarberry

for Charlefield, read Charleville

for Cross Avon, read Crosshaven

for Casline, read Castlelyons

for Manway, read Dunmanway

for Drumtarnie, read Dromdowney

for Liskell, read Lisgoold

The Earl Grey arrived at Sydney 6th October, 1848

The William & Mary arrived at Sydney 21 November, 1849

The Lismoyne arrived at Sydney 29 November, 1849

The Panama arrived at Sydney 12 January, 1850

The John Knox arrived at Sydney 29 April, 1850

The Tippoo Sahib [Tippoo Sail?] arrived at Sydney 29 July, 1850

The Maria arrived at Sydney 1 August, 1850

The Lady Kennaway arrived at Port Phillip 6 December, 1848

The Pemberton arrived at Port Phillip 14 May, 1849

The Eliza Caroline arrived at Port Phillip 31 March, 1850 http://www.irelandxo.com/node/9351

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:37 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Famine in the West Cork

 

Famine in West Cork; the Mizen Peninsula; Land and People; 1800-1852 is in book shops for quite a while but this volume by Father Patrick Hickey, currently Parish Priest of Timoleague and a native of Skeaghanore, near Ballydehob, has the distinction of being definitely the most 'under-reviewed' work of it's kind but concurrently being, one has to say, arguably, the most important historical work produced about West Cork in these generations but also, need we add, by a West Corkman.

 

Reviews that did appear were extremely brief and did not do justice to the extraordinary range of Father Hickey’s canvas and, while some writers might have been better equipped academically to evaluate this good priest’s thesis, one can only conclude that their perusals of this quite monumental work were superficial and did not attempt to appraise the amazing in-depth investigation involved or realise that much of what was unearthed was certainly new to most readers, if not necessarily to committed academics. http://www.irishidentity.com/stories/westcork.htm

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:37 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Skibbereen Heritage Centre

 

The Heritage Centre is located in the award winning, beautifully restored Old Gasworks Building, in Skibbereen, one of West Cork’s most picturesque towns.http://www.skibbheritage.com/

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:38 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Some common Cork Surnames: The chief surnames in rural County Cork include: McCarthy, Callaghan, McAuliffe, Fitzgerald, Sullivan, Murphy, Walsh, Connor and Connell.

 

Emigration from County Cork: The major period of emigration from this area was after the Great Famine of 1847. Emigrants went chiefly to the USA, Canada and Australia with large numbers settling in the US State of Oregon. Rural County Cork was heavily populated at the time of the Great Famine. A large portion of the population lived almost exclusively on potatoes. Mortality was high after the potato crop failed, due to fever and starvation. http://www.irishgenealogy.com/county/cork.htm

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:38 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

But the famine of 1846/47 has made a deeper impression on us than any of the earlier ones, partly no doubt, because the older citizens of today knew and conversed with people who had lived through that terrible time and, furthermore, the Skibbereen district was one of the most severely stricken regions in Ireland.

 

Conditions became very bad in the autumn of 1846, with the result that relief works were instituted by the Board of Works and soup kitchens were established in Skibbereen, Baltimore, Sherkin, Cape Clear, Kilcoe, Creagh, Castlehaven, Union Hall, Aughadown, Ballydehob, Schull, Dunmanus, Crookhaven, Caheragh, Durrus, Drimoleague and Drinagh. There still exists a printed copy of the ‘rules for the establishment of a charity soup house in Skibbereen’, dated 31st October 1846, under which a subscription of 1/9d per month entitled subscriber to issue 2 tickets per day, giving the holder one pint of soup for each ticket.

 

On Wednesday 30th September 1846, 800 to 1,000 men employed at Caheragh on relief works – breaking stones on the road – struck work owing to starvation and bad treatment by the official in charge. They marched in formation on Skibbereen, implements on shoulders. The alarmed town shuttered all the shops, and retired to their houses, while Michael Galwey, J.P. mobilised the military in North Street, (built that year) opposite the Court House. At that time the roads to Cork and Caheragh branched just in front of the Pro-Cathedral, and the Caheragh road ran behind to the west of the school. Accordingly, the strikers could not see the military until they were about 20 yards away. Galwey ordered his men to load and the strikers halted. He seemed to have acted very tactfully as after some conversation with the men, in which he was assisted by McCarthy Downing, M.P., Galwey called for ‘three cheers for the Queen, and plenty of employment tomorrow’ to which the strikers heartily responded. The shops were then reopened, biscuits were distributed, and after 4 hours the strikers went away.

 

On the 24th October 1846 Denis McKennedy dropped dead while working on the Caheragh Road. At the inquest, held at the Abbeystrewery Graveyard it was proved that for the week in question, Mrs McKennedy, for her family of 5, had only 21lbs of potatoes (given by a neighbour), 2 pints of flour and one cabbage. Deceased’s wages were 8d. per day, and same were in arrears for two weeks, owing to an official error. The jury found that the deceased died of starvation, owing to the gross negligence of the Board of Works, and, unfortunately, this was not the only case of its kind in the Skibbereen District.

 

Conditions grew steadily worse, though it was claimed that there was Government food stored in Skibbereen, which would not be handed out except at a high fixed price. In December 1846, Dr. O’Donovan of Skibbereen reported that he was besieged by applicants for coffins, the shortage of which had become a problem and that in a house in the Windmill he had seen two bodies which could not be buried for lack of coffins. Eventually, coffins with hinged bottoms were used to carry the corpses to the graves, from which they were dropped into the earth, and the coffins were then ready to bear the next body, which could be repeated indefinitely. The Doctor also reported that on his way to the Workhouse, he had found a woman lying in the dyke, paralysed with cold, with a dead child in her arms, and another almost dead clinging to her. She was trying to reach the Workhouse but had collapsed on the way.

 

People crawled into Skibbereen from the country, in the hope of finding some food, and died there. The Workhouse became overcrowded, and though built to hold only 800 people, eventually it had 1449 inmates, and then had to be closed against any more. The mortality there was frightful, 140 having died in December 1846 and, early in 1847 there were as many as 65 deaths in one week.

 

The Skibbereen victims were buried in the workhouse grounds, in the Old Chapel Yard, and even in the cabins and gardens where they died, but mainly in the Abbey Graveyard, where a large plot of ground was reserved for them near the entrance gate, and in front of this the Famine Memorial has been erected, on which have been inscribed the following words:- “Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of his saints. Ps.CXV-5″. ” Erected to the memory of those departed ones who fell victims to the awful famine of 1846 amd 1847. Eternal rest grant unto them O Lord, and let perpetual light shine on them. May they rest in peace, Amen.”

 

1.25 million people died in Ireland during those two years, more than all the servicemen from the whole of The British Empire who were killed during either of the two world wars.

 

There are two eyewitness accounts of the famine in our district which are too long to be set out here. The first is contained in a letter, written on 17th December 1946, by N.M. Cummins, J.P. Cork to the Duke of Wellington, reporting on the conditions in South Reen, in the Parish of Myross (where it is said the first famine death occurred), and begging for official help for the starving people. The other is contained in a pamphlet entitled ‘From Oxford to Skibbereen’, published in Oxford in 1847, giving an account of a visit to Skibbereen, made that year by Lord Dufferin and Hon. G.F. Boyle, after which the former subscribed £1,000 to the relief funds.

 

Rev. Richard Boyle Townsend, the Protestant Rector of Abbeystrewery, who was interviewed by Lord Dufferin, and who worked manfully to alleviate the distress in Skibbereen, himself fell victim in the end to the famine fever and died 7th May 1850, and received what might be described as a public funeral, so much was he respected by all classes and creeds for his help. He was not the only one of the helpers who suffered the same fate.

 

Many of the buildings occupied at the time of the Famine are still in existence today, in varying stages of repair. The Skibbereen Trail is an excellent way to visit these.

 

The Great Famine Commemoration Exhibition at Skibbereen Heritage Centre uses today’s media to give an insight into Famine times in Skibbereen. With a mixture of touch screen factual information, TV monitors with characters of the era telling the tale; it also features The Skibbereen Famine Trail showing buildings of interest around town. Open 7 days in high season, please contact + 353 (0)28 40900.

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:39 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

When Famine Devastated West Cork

 

The Famine sparked off a decline in the Irish population which lasted half a century. It concentrated within a short period many changes in Ireland's social and economic life which would have occurred but not so suddenly. One of the major disasters of the nineteenth century, the Famine marked a great divide in modern Irish History and, through the impact of emigration, its effects spread far beyond Irish shores. Cork and especially West Cork were among the worst hit areas.

It is hard to believe that the invasion of the tiny potato killing fungus 'Phythophthora infestans" could result in the Great Famine of 1856/17 and the death of a million people out of a population of eight and a half. But it was not solely the loss of the potato crop which ended in death; combined with a rigid doctrinaire attitude to famine relief and widespread absentee landlords, it was a deadly mix.

 

Soup Kitchens

 

Food for the Government relief schemes was stored in depots but was only available at a high price and most tenant farmers were too poor to afford it. Instead, they went to soup kitchens, many overflowing, unable to cope with the numbers which arrived at their doors. They died outside the doors.

Burying the dead became more and more of a problem resulting in the rapid spread of disease. There were reports of hinged coffins and mass open graves. Today, there are ruined workhouses all over the country and famine memorials alone survive to remind us of those dreadful times, not even a hundred and fifty years ago.

To paint an accurate picture of the society on which famine visited, we must look at the report of the Devon Commission of February, 1845. This was a Royal Commission chaired by the Earl of Devon which visited every point of Ireland as a response to Daniel O'Connell's monster meetings which had been taking place all over the country. http://www.failteromhat.com/southernstar/page10.php

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:39 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

MORTALITY IN SKIBBEREEN.THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS.

[Jan 30, 1847.

The "Keen"* comes wailing on the wind,

That sweeps o'er Erin's mountains blue;

It chills the heart of Earl and hind--

It lends the land a ghastly hue!

The song of death by Death is chanted!

The dying bear the shroudless dead;

Th' uncoffin'd clay a grave is granted--

The very worm averts his head.

Darkly proceed the famish'd cotters;

To-morrow may behold their grave:

The young man towards the churchyard totters--

The bravest heart no more is brave.

Those gray hairs may have known the wave

Where Nelson's SIGNAL boldly flew;

Perchance they dared the Gallic glaive,

And bear the scars of Waterloo.

 

Slowly the gaunt procession wends--

The blessed voice of Hope is faint;

Her spotless stole Religion rends

In misery o'er the dying plaint;

While Pestilence, on sable wings,

Aids vulture Famine in the feast,

Which vies well with the offerings

Paid to the Plague-- Scourge of the East.And yet-- oh! paradox-- oh! shame!--

Oh! blind improvidence! The land

Is of the best that ever came

Forth from its mighty Maker's hand.

Fertile and fair, it should have been

The glory of the British crown;

And now, behold the shudd'ring scene!--

The seedless fields-- the spectral town.

But Nature vindicates her God;

Teaches a lesson from the soil:

A voice springs from the blighted sod

In mercy for the sons of toil.

Fair Nature's energies expire

When rack'd for one poor porcal root;

And Labour merits better hire

Than the sad fare of Raleigh's fruit.

 

The "Keen" comes wailing on the blast,

The voice of Winter joins the dirge;

The shadows of Despair are cast

Around the new grave's narrow verge.

Oh! let us hope that day will rise

To dissipate this fearful gloom;

And bring the blessings of the skies

To raise a nation from her tomb.-- LTHE former accounts of the ravages of disease at Skibbereen continue to be but too sadly confirmed. From a drawing made on the spot, we give a sketch of a scene of no unusual occurrence, as appears from the following extract of a letter, received by Mr. Blake, of Cork, from Dr. Crowley, of Skibbereen, dated Jan. 22:--

"Deaths here are daily increasing. Dr. Donovan and I are just this moment after returning from the village of South Reen, where we had to bury a body ourselves that was eleven days dead; and where do you think? In a kitchen garden. We had to dig the ground, or rather the hole, ourselves; no one would come near us, the smell was so intolerable. We are half dead from the work lately imposed on us.

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:40 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
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Posts: 1033

bark General Greene, Cork to Boston 1847 {ship list} ...http://www.theshipslist.com/.../Gen.GreeneBos_47.shtml

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:40 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Transcript Cork

Skibbereen, 16th January 1847

Sir

I have the honor to report that I visited the Relief Committee at Bantry on

Tuesday last, and submitted the object of my visit to this part of the Country -

that of establishing soup kitchens. I further informed them of the extent to which

I was authorized to meet any local subscriptions. There is one soup Establishment

in operation in the town of Bantry, producing 120 Gallons daily - it is desirable

that this quantity should be extended. The enclosed list of subscriptions

Commissary General

Sir Randolph J. Routh

[page 2]

from Bantry has this day reached me – it is not “pro-forma”. I however send it

forward, in preference to incurring the delay which arise by sending it back to

Bantry, where the poor House is full, and consequently a great mass of the

paupers is thrown upon the Soup Relief.

At Glengarriff, and through the line of Country to Adrigole there is great distress

and suffering, notwithstanding the large numbers employed upon the public

works. In the Barony of Bear, there is a quarter proportion of the population

employed on the Roads – over 3,000 – than in

[page 3]

any Barony I have visited. The mountanous and rocky nature of the Country

limits the Engineer to particular localities, consequently many of the poor people

have at least five miles of heavy mountain track to walk daily from their cabins to

the Works, and the same returning.

The sole dependence of these people was upon the potatoe, the quantity of corn

produced in the Barony has always been small – it is now nearly exhausted. At

Castletown last week the markets were so completely emptied, that people who

could afford it, had to send to Bantry, a distance of 35 miles, for a loaf of Bread.

All classes there were suffering

[page 4]

‘till the arrival of some vessels from Cork with Provisions.

I have urged the very few residents at Glengarriff to use their best efforts to raise

some subscriptions. I offer them £10 from the ‘Anonymous’ fund, and to ‘double’

all they can raise by subscription. I was in hopes to have received a list from

Glengarriff in time for this post.

At Adrigole the Rector has a small Soup Establishment in operation upon a private

fund, which is doing much good. The distress is so great about Adrigole that it is

very desirable the ‘Funds’ should be

[page 5]

increased. The Rector is endeavouring to raise some subscriptions, but as he

stands ‘alone’ in his locality, I fear it will not be much. I therefore propose us

[using] his ‘List’, to recommend some additional assistance, beyond the ‘pound

for pound’.

Soup Establishments at Glengarriff and at Adrigole, cannot be too extensively

encouraged.

At Castletown I found a great want of unanimity in the Relief Committee, in fact,

it is in such bad ‘working order’ that I could not gain much information as to the

actual extent of distress in the district, it has been, from all account,

[page 6]

great, with some accute suffering, which the very opportune arrival of the ‘Dee’

Steamer from Cork on Thursday last, with provisions, has checked. This Barony is

now so exclusively dependent upon ‘Foreign’ supplies, that it should be carefully

watched.

There is a small soup Establishment in operation at Castletown, supported by a

private ‘fund’, which I regretted to observe for the first time, was the cause of

much acrimonious discussion between the Clergy of the two churches, so strong,

that I yet doubt whether my efforts to

[page 7]

Establish a Soup Kitchen upon a more extended footing will be met with sufficient

unanimity to be of service. This is to be deplored - for there is a great extent of

misery in the neighbourhood. I offered the Committee ‘pound for pound’ of any

sum they can raise by local subscription, and I will add £15 from the ‘anonymous

fund’.

I have written to Lord Bandon suggesting for the consideration of his Lordship,

the expediency of appointing a district Committee for the last part of the Barony

of Bear, from Glengarriff, to Adrigole, to meet at

[page 8]

the former place. The distance from Castletown to Glengarriff, 25 miles, is too

great for the poor of the latter place to derive any Relief from the Castletown

Committee.

The difficulty of obtaining ‘Boilers’ for the ‘Soup’ is great, and causes at this

moment an unfortunate delay, frequently of many weeks, this is very serious. If a

few ‘Iron Boilers’, varying in size from 60 to 120 Gallons, could be sent direct

from Liverpool to Cork, to be distributed to the Soup Committees as a part of the

‘donation’ it would afford great assistance.

[page 9]

There is a ‘foundary’ in Cork where some few may be perhaps procured. I will

make enquiries there.

Throughout the Barony of Bere, as in most others I have visited, every

description of Labour, whether Agricultural, the Fisheries, or otherwise, is totally

abandoned for the public works. The man who cannot get immediate Employment

upon a ‘Road’ ‘starves’ upon expectation, rather than put hand to sail, or launch a

boat upon his own account.

I have the honor to be

Sir

your most obedient

Humble Servant

William Bishop

Assistant Commissary General

[Relief Commission Papers, RLFC 7/6/24]

--

 

WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


October 17, 2015 at 7:29 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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