'An tOcras Mór' The Great Hunger.

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Forum Home > How Each County Was Affected "The Great Hunger" > County Sligo - Sligeach / Co. Shligigh

SWIFTY
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Posts: 1033

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 27, 2015 at 9:57 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

"Those who know not their past are as children": Cicero

 

Gore-Booth, Lissadell, Palmerston, and the Sligo Famine Emigration Experience of the1840s

http://www.sligoheritage.com/Archcoffinships.htm

 

 

Famine pot: A remnant of famine times in a field at Ardawoggy, Co. Mayo

The subject of famine emigration is so vast, even in the Sligo context, it is difficult to know where to begin. A list of books for further research and background information is provided at the end of this article for those who are new to the subject. On this page we will confine ourselves primarily, but not exclusively, to some specifics regarding the fate of tenants of the Gore-Booth and Palmerston estates, which will be of interest to historians and genealogists as well as the casually curious.

 

In 1847, the first of Sir Robert Gore-Booths’s ships for that year, the Aeolus, left the port of Sligo with 500 of his tenants. As usual the landlord’s agents and a local newspaper, the Sligo Journal, a voice for the landlord classes, gave glowing accounts of the wonderful vessel and the luxurious accommodatio

May 18, 2015 at 11:07 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

A few weeks ago I went to the famine graveyard in Sligo. I couldn’t get in as the gate was locked. I phoned Sligo County Council to see if they knew anything about why the gate was locked and was put through to the parks department. They had no idea why it was locked and no idea who I should contact.

I went into town and called into the tourist office to see if they had any idea about the locked gate. They didn’t and again phoned the council….they got speaking to someone else who didn’t even know Sligo had a famine graveyard!

http://magnumlady.com/2012/10/04/the-famine-graveyard-sligo/

May 18, 2015 at 11:08 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

The Great Irish Famine

by Canon John O'Rourke, 1874, Dublin

 

Charles K. O'Hara was chairman of the Co.Sligo Board of guardians in 1846/47

Mr. Crichton, Somerton, Ballymote noted the crop failure in 1846 was not bad.

8/3/1846...Mr. Cooper of Markree saw a cloud fall over the land which gave notice of the impendingcorp failure.

Fall of 1846- One landlord evicted 30 families affecting some 150 indivuals.

Feb. 8, 1847...100's and thousands die from starvation

The Sligo workhouse had become a pesthouse, and was abandoned by the guardians, in terror.

Disentery was the main killer of the young

May 1847...Sligo is a plague spot; disease in every street; and the worst kind.

May 18, 2015 at 11:09 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

The Memorial at the Harbour

 

 

The statue below is a memorial in bronze, erected at Sligo Harbour in 1997 to mark the 150th anniversity of 'Black '47'. The family are shown comforting one another, and the child points to the New Land to which they will sail. More than 30,000 people left Sligo for new lives abroad between the years 1847 and 1851. This sculpture is one of three commissioned by the Sligo Famine Commemoration Committee.

 

In the background, a plaque displays a 'Letter to America, January 2, 1850'. Owen Larkin did not know, when he wrote the letter, that his son was already dead.

 

I am now I may say alone in the world all my brothers and sisters are dead and children but yourself... We are all ejected out of Mr. Enright's ground the times was so bad and all Ireland in such a state of poverty that no person could pay rent. My only hope now rests with you, as I am without one shilling and as I said before I must either beg or go to the poorhouse... I remain your affectionate father Owen Larkin be sure answer this by return of post

http://www.irishhistorylinks.net/pages/SligoFamineMemorial.html

May 18, 2015 at 11:10 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Cholera

Cholera stuck Sligo town in 1832 and over 10,000 of the

population left town, leaving only one third in the Borough.

The Fever Hospital (built in 1822) received 470 patients with

317 deaths in August. This building no longer stands and it was

located at the top of the hill behind the current hospital, close

to the helicopter pad. People were buried in the “cholera fields”

behind the fever hospital.

May 18, 2015 at 11:10 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

FAMINE YEARS

 

THE PRE-FAMINE YEARS AT LISSADELL 1823 - 1844

 

The Gore Booths were resident landowners, unlike many of their peers (Lord Palmerston at nearby Classiebawn being just one example), who lived on their property, and ploughed money into improvements. The third baronet (Robert Gore Booth) began an improvement and expansion of the Lissadell estate in the late 18th century, and this work was continued by the fourth Baronet (also Robert Gore Booth), when he reached adulthood. In the 1830s Sir Robert acquired a further 875 acres in Ballygilgan (to the east of Lissadell), and he arranged a programme of assisted emigration of 52 families to Quebec in Canada from the area known locally as the seven cartrons. His assisted emigration programme took five years, from 1834 to 1839, and in 1839 he paid each person £2 a head for disturbance, £4 for every acre of good land, and sea passage in the Pomona. He had already paid 'compensation' of £196.58.04 to tenants for 'giving up possession' in 1834, and again in 1835. Eighteen families who declined to emigrate were given landholdings in Lissadell, Cloonmullen, Ballintemple, Cartonwilliamoge, Cooladrumman, Cillaghmore and Ballygilgan in Sligo.

 

There were two reasons for the assisted emigration programme. First the rundale system operated by tenants led to the rapid growth of sub-tenants and their dependants, all subsisting on smaller tracts of land, as the system allowed continual subdivision of the holdings. The consequent congestion, and the non viability of the subdivided holdings, was recognised by some tenants, many of whom favoured the assisted emigration programme. Sir Robert told the Select Committee of the House of Lords on Colonization from Ireland in 1848 that "applications to emigrate considerably exceeded the places I had available".

http://www.lissadellhouse.com/famine.html

May 18, 2015 at 11:11 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Sligo is a county which witnessed the departure of so many famine ships during the Irish Famine. My interest in this part of our history started when I was developing the Westport page of this site. Being UK born and reared, I had little knowledge of the Irish Famine, other than to know it happened and a little of how.While working on the main Sligo page I came across some interesting reading material about a tiny island on the Saint Lawrence River with a sad connection back to Ireland. Grosse-Île, 30 miles east of Quebec in Canada, was to be the final resting place of over 6,000 Irish people who had fled Ireland leaving tyranny and starvation behind them. But some of them carried with them a plague that was to cause havoc and death in the New World.

http://www.webring.org/l/rd?ring=celticihs;id=58;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Emoytura%2Ecom%2Fsligo1%2Ehtm

May 18, 2015 at 11:12 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

he Great Famine which devastated Ireland between 1845 and 1850 was certainly the most terrible tragedy ever to occur in Ireland.

Sligo Town and County were particularly badly hit with more than 52,000 local people either dying of starvation or disease, or through emigration in a five year period.

Amongst the causes of the famine was the failure of the potato crop, a cheap, easily grown, vitamin packed food which was the stable food of most of the population of Ireland at the time.

News of the disease came in 1853 from newspapers which carried news from America of a disease which was attacking potatoes there.

http://www.sligotown.net/famine-monument.shtml

May 18, 2015 at 11:13 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

A lot of people emigrated during the Famine. This means that they left Ireland to move to another country.

 

During the Famine years, the coffin ships sailed from Sligo Port. Before they reached their destination, some of the passengers would already have died. So they were buried at sea.

 

Families emigrated from Sligo to go to places such as Canada, America, England and Australia.

 

It was approximately £12 for a family to buy a ticket for an emigration ship.

The ships were full of disease, and were not very comfortable. Many died on route to their destination. For this reason, they are known as coffin ships.http://www.exploringsligo.net/html/heritage/fane.htm

May 18, 2015 at 11:14 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Sligo, Co. Sligo (1997)

 

Three monument commissions (Sligo, 1997):

 

Faoin Sceach, St. John’s Hospital

Artist: Fred Conlon

Co. Sligo Famine Commemoration Committee

 

Untitled (graveyard gates), St. John’s Hospital

Artist: Niall Bruton

Co. Sligo Famine Commemoration Committee

 

Famine Family, Sligo town centre

Artist: Niall Bruton

Co. Sligo Famine Commemoration Committee http://irishfaminememorials.com/2014/01/16/sligo-co-sligo-1997/

May 18, 2015 at 11:16 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

The Famine Ships

 

By Edward Laxton

 

Sligo was the embarkation point for many of the coffin ships and for the poorest passengers, usually the victims of landlord emigration. Three broad inlets reach into the Atlantic coastline, doubling the size of Sligo Bay, with the town's quays magnificently sited in the narrows of the Garavogue River beyond the bay. The port had a long tradition of sending her ships to all corners of the world, and Peter O'Connor, a leading Sligo merchant, ordered the 276-ton barque Industry to be built in 1839 with a light draught to carry a cargo of Canadian timber through the shallow channel in the bay, and up the river to his saw mills, at all levels of the tide.

 

At the start of the Famine, Industry had valuable two-way cargoes and we can only imagine the effects of the shallow draft of the ship and her cargo carried westbound out of Sligo across the heaving ocean. The voyage home was always faster with the favourable westerly winds, but in June 1845 Industry's owners proudly proclaimed that she had journeyed from Sligo to Quebec, under Captain Thomas Barrett, her regular master, in 29 days. It is not known whether she was carrying passengers on that trip, but 18 months later she conveyed 184 Famine emigrants from Sligo to New York, embarking on December 26, 1846, under the command of Captain Michael Kelly. Though the late crossing was unusual at this time, winter voyages would become common during the Famine years.

 

During the crossing Industry ran into a succession of storms which allowed little progress. Over three long winter months the ship floundered at sea; food and water ran low; and, even with the introduction of strict rationing, two seamen and 15 passengers died from malnutrition. Industry arrived in America on April 11, 1847, after 106 days at sea.

 

The round trip took almost six months, with the Industry returning to Sligo on June 16, 1847. The following year Industry narrowly escaped disaster as she tried to enter port in a fierce December gale, on passage from Liverpool with a mixed cargo of Indian meal, flour and coal. She was driven onto the beach at Bowmore where she stuck fast and, during the following weeks, took a fearful battering. The cargo was recovered but the ship could not be re-floated and Peter O'Connor decided to sell the wrecked vessel. The auction of Industry as she lay was announced in Sligo but withdrawn when O'Connor discovered she was not as badly damaged as had first been thought 

http://www.rossespointshanty.com/Heritage/famship.htm

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


May 18, 2015 at 11:19 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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