'An tOcras Mór' The Great Hunger.

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Forum Home > Memorials Throughout The World Of "The Great Hunger" > Sticky: The Great Famine of Ireland is memorialized in many locations throughout Ireland,

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

 

The Great Famine of Ireland is memorialized in many locations throughout Ireland, especially in those regions that suffered the greatest losses, and also in cities overseas with large populations descended from Irish immigrants.

 

Whereas the landlord class had the resources to leave an indelible mark on the landscape, the Irish tenants lived in poverty and nothing of a physical nature has survived to commemorate their lives. Many memorials now serve to do just that.

 

Below you will find a list of memorials to all the sufferers of the great Irish famine. Not all are pretty but neither was the famine and what my Irish decendents went through. Many questions are still asked about, how and why this happened. Were there people in high places who helped plan these horrific events as some believe? Or was it just time and unforseen circumstances which tossed the dice with the wrong numbers for the Irish? A long time has gone by since this happened and it is not likely that we will become more enlightened than we already are, but perhaps we may learn something from the past . That is my prayer.

 

Ireland

 

 

~ Strokestown Park Famine Museum, Ireland

~ Custom House Quays, Dublin, Ireland. Painfully thin sculptural figures, by artist Rowan Gillespie, stand as if walking towards the emigration ships on the Dublin Quayside.

~ St. Stephen's Green, Dublin, Ireland. "Famine", a sculpture by Edward Delaney.

~ Limerick, The 'Broken Heart' Famine memorial, Lower Mallow Street. The sculpture is a fountain in the shape of a broken heart in memory of the forced emigration of several thousands who fled to America and beyond from nearby Steamboat Quay. Also in Limerick city, the Pauper's Graveyard (now known as St Brigid's cemetery) in Killeely. Here a large timber cross was erected on the site of this mass graveyard. There are no headstones.

~ Murrisk, County Mayo, Ireland. This sculpture of a famine ship, near the foot of Croagh Patrick, depicts the refugees it carries as dead souls hanging from the sides.

~ Donaghmore Famine Museum - set in Donaghmore Workhouse in County Laois.

~ Doolough, County Mayo. A memorial commemorates famine victims who walked from Louisburgh along the mountain road to Delphi Lodge to seek relief from the Poor Board who were meeting there. Returning after their request was refused, many of them died at this point. This became known as the Doolough Tragedy.

~ Doagh Island, Inishowen, County Donegal, Ireland. Doagh Visitor Centre and Famine Museum has exhibits and memorial on the effects of the famine in Inishowen, Donegal.

~ Ennistymon, County Clare, Ireland. This was the first memorial in Ireland to honour those who suffered and were lost during the Great Famine. It is erected across the street from an abandoned workhouse where an estimated 20,000 Irish died and a mass graveyard for children who perished and were buried without coffins.

~ Sligo, County Sligo, has three memorial sculptures erected by the Sligo Famine Commemoration Committee. One is at the quayside, of a family comforting each other, where 30,000 people emigrated between 1847 and 1851. The other two are the gates of a famine graveyard and of a tree (called Faoin Sceach) in the grounds of the graveyard, where approximately 2,000 famine victims are buried.

~ Newcastle West, Co. Limerick, The Famine Graveyard is at the rear of modern day St. Ita's Hospital. Hundreds of people who died during the famine are buried there in unmarked graves. The cemetery is marked by a plain old cross. Close by stands the Workhouse.

~ Kilkenny in the McDonagh Junction complex. The memorial is marked by a small garden, where many bodies were found during an excavation.

~ Ballingarry Famine Warhouse 1848. Widow McCormack's house, the site of the 1848 rebellion, has now been converted into a museum.



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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


March 31, 2010 at 6:39 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

The Irish-Australian community's desire to place a sculpture at the Hyde Park Barracks to commemorate the passage of 150 years since the Great Irish Famine represented a huge challenge. The Barracks in Sydney is imbued with so much of this nation's history that it has almost sacred status in the minds of many Australians and was not taken lightly. The monument erected to the Great Irish Famine is an exception.

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


March 31, 2010 at 6:40 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

 

Famine Remembrance

Fatherless and motherless, no brothers have I

And all my little sisters in the cold grave lie

Wasted with hunger I saw them falling dead

Lonely and bitter are the tears I shed

 

To this haunting Irish air, 32 'orphan' girls carrying candles and lilies, and representing an orphan girl from each county of Ireland, walked in procession to the sanctuary. Accompanying each girl was a descendant of the original orphan girls. From the dais each girl read out the name of the orphan she was representing e.g. Catherine Naughton, 18, Galway; Catherine Kean, 17, Clare; Margaret Devlin, 16, Armagh; Anne Bracken, 16, Roscommon; Mary Cassidy, 15, Longford etc


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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


March 31, 2010 at 6:41 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

 

Australia's Memorial to the Great Famine

What the memorial symbolizes.

Photobucket

 

 

The memorial, sculpted by Angela and Hossein Valamanesh, symbolises the experiences of young Irishwomen fleeing the Great Irish Famine of 1845-49.

 

"The table, split in two, has on one end a simple bowl with a void in its base that continues through the table. At the other end is a simple institutional table-setting, with bread and utensils also cast in bronze. This further symbolizes the contrast between hunger and comfort, which underpinned the role of the Barracks as shelter. The suggestion of continuity in the two ends of the table represents the continuous and evolving relationships between the site and the lives of those who immigrated. The table and the more intimate spaces created within the rotated wall evoke the domestic nature of life and work for the majority of Irish women migrants while their simplicity and sparseness allude to the subject of the Famine." WGT


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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


March 31, 2010 at 6:44 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

 

United States of America

 

 

~ In Boston, Massachusetts, a bronze statue located at the corner of Washington and School Streets on the Freedom Trail depicts a starving woman, looking up to the heavens as if to ask "Why?", while her children cling to her. A second sculpture shows the figures hopeful as they land in Boston.

~ Buffalo, New York has a stone memorial on its waterfront.

~ Cambridge, Massachusetts has a memorial to the famine on its Common.

~ Chicago, Illinois has a Famine Memorial at Chicago Gaelic Park.

~ Cleveland, Ohio A 12-foot (3.7 m) high stone Celtic cross, located on the east bank of the Cuyahoga River.

~ In Fairfield, Connecticut a memorial to the Famine victims stands in the chapel of Fairfield University.

~ In Hamden, Connecticut, a collection of art and literature from the Great Famine is on display in the Lender Family Special Collection Room of the Arnold Bernhard Library at Quinnipiac University.

~ Irish Hills, Michigan - The Ancient Order of Hibernian's An Gorta Mor Memorial is located on the grounds of St. Joseph's Shrine in the Irish Hills district of Lenawee County, Michigan. There are thirty-two black stones as the platform, one for each county. The grounds are surrounded with a stone wall. The Lintel is a step from Penrose Quay in Cork Harbour. The project was the result of several years of fundraising by the Ancient Order of Hibernians in Lenewee County. It was dedicated in 2004 by AOH Divisional President, Patrick Maguire, and many political and Irish figures from around the state of Michigan.

~ Keansburg, NJ has a Hunger Memorial in Friendship Park on Main Street.

~ New York, New York has the Irish Hunger Memorial which looks like a sloping hillside with low stone walls and a roofless cabin on one side and a polished wall with lit (or white) lines on the other three sides. The memorial is in Battery Park City, a short walk west from the World Trade Center site. Another memorial exists in V.E. Macy Park in Ardsley, New York about 32 km north of Manhattan.

~ Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

~ Phoenix, Arizona has a famine memorial in the form of a dolmen at the Irish Cultural Center.

~ Hackensack New Jersey has a large stone located on the front corner of the Bergen County Government Court House on Main Street, honoring all of those who perished in the famine. Every year in October, numerous Irish-American organizations from northern New Jersey hold a ceremony to remember all of those who perished.


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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


March 31, 2010 at 6:45 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

 

 

Boston Memorial

 

The Boston Irish Famine Memorial is a tribute to an entire generation of Irish men, women and children whose lives were disrupted by a series of events that took place 150 years ago. Nearly one million Irish died of starvation and disease, and another two million fled the country, immigrating largely to North America. The remaining population was left to contend with death, dislocation, poverty, and the near ruination of a culture that had flourished for centuries.

 

Over 100,000 Irish refugees landed in Boston, taking a perilous voyage across the Atlantic Ocean. So many Irish died at sea that poet John Boyle O'Reilly called the Atlantic Ocean upon which they traveled "a bowl of tears."

 

Settling into overcrowded, unsanitary tenement housing along Boston's waterfront and in the North End, this generation of Irish endured great hardship and humiliation, plagued by poverty and disease. The average life span of an Irish immigrant in Boston was 14 years. They were met with a mixture of compassion and resentment. "Native Bostonians might have been willing to send money and food to aid the starving Irish as long as they remained in Ireland," wrote historian Thomas O'Connor. "But they certainly didn't want them coming to America." 'No Irish Need Apply' signs in newspaper ads and storefront windows were common, as native Americans, strenuously opposed to foreigners, continued to harass the struggling Irish.

Photobucket

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


March 31, 2010 at 6:47 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

 

"An Gorta Mor" The Great Hunger

Battery Park - New York, NY USA

 

The Irish Hunger Memorial (which takes its name from the Irish term for the famine of 1845-52, "An Gorta Mor," The Great Hunger) stands on a half-acre site at the corner of Vesey Street and North End Avenue in Battery Park City, between the Embassy Suites Hotel and the Hudson River.

 

Design Concept

 

The Memorial represents a rural Irish landscape with an abandoned stone cottage, stone walls, fallow potato fields and the flora on the north Connacht wetlands. It is both a metaphor for the Great Irish Famine and a reminder that hunger today is often the result of lack of access to land. Moving beyond the fixed dates of the Great Irish Famine, the Memorial is a living site. Over time, the landscape will change; the text will be updated; the visitor will be encouraged to become actively engaged in meeting the challenge of world hunger.

Photobucket

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


March 31, 2010 at 6:50 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

.UK

~ Liverpool, England. A memorial is in the grounds of St Luke's Church on Leece Street, itself a memorial to the victims of the Blitz. It recalls that from 1849-1852 1,241,410 Irish immigrants arrived in the city and that from Liverpool they dispersed to locations around the world. Many died despite the help they received within the city, some 7000 in the city perished within one year. There is also a plaque on the gates to Clarence Dock. Unveiled in 2000, the plaque inscription reads in Gaelic and English: "Through these gates passed most of the 1,300,000 Irish migrants who fled from the Great Famine and 'took the ship' to Liverpool in the years 1845-52" The Maritime Museum, Albert Dock, Liverpool has an exhibition regarding the Irish Migration, showing models of ships, documentation and other facts on Liverpool's history.

~ Cardiff, Wales. A Celtic Cross made of Irish limestone on a base of Welsh stone stands in the city's Cathays Cemetery. The cross was unveiled in 1999 as the high point in the work of the Wales Famine Forum, remembering the 150th Anniversary of the famine. The memorial is dedicated to every person of Irish origin, without distinction on grounds of class, politics, allegiance or religious belief, who has died in Wales.


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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


March 31, 2010 at 6:53 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

 

Canada

 

Memorial at Ireland Park on Bathurst Quay, Toronto

~ Grosse-Île, Quebec, Canada, the largest famine grave site outside of Ireland. A large Celtic cross, erected by the Ancient Order of Hibernians, stands in remembrance overlooking the St. Lawrence River. The island is a Canadian national historic site.

~ Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, 12-foot (3.7 m) limestone cross donated by the government of Ireland in 1997.

~ Kingston, Ontario, Canada, has three monuments. Celtic cross at An Gorta Mor Park on the waterfront. Another is located at Skeleton (McBurney) Park (formerly Kingston Upper Cemetery). Angel of Resurrection monument, first dedicated in 1894 at St. Mary's cemetery.

~ Maidstone, Ontario, Canada, has a nine foot stone Celtic Cross at the cemetery outside St. Mary's Church

~ Montreal, Quebec, Canada, the "Boulder Stone" in Pointe-Saint-Charles

~ Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Four bronze statues arriving at the Toronto wharves, at Ireland Park on Bathurst Quay, modeled after the Dublin Departure Memorial. List of names of those who died of typhus in the Toronto fever sheds shortly after their arrival. Current memorial plaque at Metro Hall. Also a pieta statue outside St. Paul's Catholic Basilica in memory of the famine victims and Bishop Michael Power, who died tending to the sick.


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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


March 31, 2010 at 6:54 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Mary Lou McKeone
Member
Posts: 5

Swifty..Was in the process of sending you the web address for the Boston 'Famine Memorial' site but true to your moniker...The information is added..The location of the monument is not optimum but I hope with these sites and having the Irish decendants understand the strife and survival of their ancestors that it can be move to a more prominent location......T/U

In Irish South Boston, there was also a large Swedish population.  My family has a Swedish surname.  As a child, my family move to their first home in West Roxbury.  It was considered an upscale community in Bos.  Nine am was the traditional children's mass in the parish.  The Irish maid next door related this story to my mother.  While serving Sun am breakfast and we being loaded into the car in our Sun best, the wife said to her husband, 'Oh , my goodness,  their one of them.'  This was 56 years ago.  Being Irish, we won them over.   We did belong and other Irish families followed making St Theresa's and Holy Name the most giving parishes in the  archdioses.

It took 150 years from the famine but Boston can not deny or ignore the tremendous contributions of the 'Famine Irish' on the fabric of Boston.  Proud to be their descendant.  ML

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March 31, 2010 at 11:36 AM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Thanks g for your info . yeah i am on the ball obtaining all the information i can get , and its nice to see members putting input :D

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


March 31, 2010 at 1:10 PM Flag Quote & Reply

MindyMc
Member
Posts: 2

Such a wealth of information!

 

I hope to be able to see the Strokestown Park Famine Museum in August when I am in Ireland and some of the other memorial sites. 

 

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~ Níl eagla orm roimh éinne ach Dia amhain ~

April 2, 2010 at 4:08 PM Flag Quote & Reply

SWIFTY
Site Owner
Posts: 1033

Mindy,  We hope that everyone sees the website like that , :wink:

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WHEN GENOCIDE BECAME "FAMINE" : IRELAND, 1845 - 1850

This petition seeks your support for a campaign to:

* Persuade relevant authors, editors and website content providers to stop using the word ‘Famine’ for what took place in Ireland between 1845 and 1850, and start using terms such as, "The Great Hunger" or 'An tOcras Mór

PETITION LINK- TO CHANGE THE WORD FAMINE http://www.petitions24.com/when_famine_became_genocide_ireland_1845_-_1850


April 2, 2010 at 4:12 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Emmet
Member
Posts: 10

I was under the impression there was a national museum to remember an Gorta mor in Roscommon.

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Pep without purpose is piffle!

April 10, 2010 at 9:13 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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